Which skills are going to make your kids winners in 2020?

The fact that Internet is changing the way our brains work is no news. But Elon University and Pew Internet and American Life Project just published a great report that goes way further. They’ve asked to 1000 gurus – like Danah Boyd, Clay Shirky, David Weinberger, Alexandra Samuel, and Janna Anderson – how the cognitive future of kids is going to look like in 2020 and which life skills will be crucial to be successful.

Multitasking, rapidity in searching, browsing, synthesizing information and assessing its quality are going to be key. The importance of these skills, the experts claim, needs to be recognized and processed by the education system. No reform of education can leave behind these issues, because any kid will have to develop this kind of tech literacy to be successful in the post Internet era.

At Timbuktu we always say that attention has become more important than concentration. Attention is a key skill because it gives us the possibility to be exposed to a huge quantity of information and just catch moment by moment what’s relevant and valuable for us. In a way, we can imagine that this is one of the main skills that you can train while playing video games. Take a look at what Gabe Zichermann, chair of the Gamification Summit and Workshops, says about video games and the way they can help us understand what the future of the education, and of the world itself will look like.

2 comments
admin
admin

Hello Sandro, thank you for your message! The report is very interesting and we do suggest to take a look at it if you're interested in this field. It's not just enthusiasm, and it focuses on the challenge in a very smart way. Of course not every videogame is a great education instrument, but the same is also true for textbooks (even though that's supposed to be their primary function). We like to share thoughts and resources that inspire us. Your point about "too safe" videogames is really great! We'll think about it. Thanks for sharing it with us!

sandro
sandro

I think it's a very poor way to analyze the videogame and virtual issue. only few games and apps, like timbuktu, are projected to develope creativity and imagination. the others are centered on technical challenges and repetitive stories and actions. It's only a way to simplify your life for a moment, to reduce your multiple perceptions and emotions only in a direction already projected and packaged. usually there's no real complexity in videogames, all is controlled. This is not a training for children it's a way to get easy satisfactions avoiding reality. I don't think they are dangerous for kids, in a paradoxical way maybe they are too "safe".